Gane’s Manhattan Theatre

The Film Index, February 5, 1910:

Ganes (3)

“Mr. William Gane, General Manager of the Moving Pictures Company of America, proprietor of this house, is shown standing at the right of the entrance. William Wright of Kalem Co., stands at the extreme left of the picture.”

Photos of the Kalem Stock Company are on display. The stage attraction is Ala Rajah, “wizard of  Sahara–he is not only mystifying he is really startling.”

The Film Index, January 22, 1910:
“Since its opening on September 13, 1909, Gane’s Manhattan Theatre at Broadway and 31st street, has been playing to its full capacity, and at times it is necessary to turn many away, especially in the evening, because of the lack of room.

“Yet the theatre is a very large and very modern one. Three stories of a big office building were torn out and remodeled. The back  of the orchestra is on a level with the street and gradually slopes down to the basement of the building.

“The balcony occupies what was  the second and third stories. Boxes are on either side of the orchestra. A large well-equipped stage affords room for any kind of vaudeville act. The house is artistically decorated and handsomely carpeted throughout. It is owned by the Moving Picture Company of America, of which Mr. Gane’s is the general manager.”

Cezar Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently seeking funding for “Editing & Formatting” the first three volumes of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, 3rd Edition

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La Corona Theatre, Corona, California

The Film Index, August 20, 1910:

corona_pe

La Corona Theatre
E. L. Sparr, manager and proprietor

“This picture theatre is one of the best in California. It seats 350, and is equipped with a Standard A Picture Machine and a Hallberg  Economizer.”

hallberg

Cezar Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently seeking funding for “Editing & Formatting” the first three volumes of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, 3rd Edition

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Captured on East 14th Street

Moving Picture World, September 23, 1910:

captured_pe

“The Comedy is one of the most successful picture houses in New York. It is operated on a continuous policy, two projecting machines being used, thus doing away with waits or delays.

“The only feature about the theatre which we could  not commend  was the excessive poster display in the lobby and around the front. Manager Kauffman agrees this did not add to the beauty of his house and he would willingly dispense with this method of advertising if he was sure his business would not suffer, but he felt that his receipts were at least thirty-five per cent due to banners and posters.

“We presume this is his reason for the exaggerated showing of supposed scenes from the films, yet we believe the business would not suffer were artistic signs and banners used in smaller numbers.” 

 

wireless

Moving Picture World, September 10, 1910

Captured by Wireless

Comedy Theatre
45 East 14th Street
New York, NY

 

Cezar Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently seeking funding for “Editing & Formatting” the first three volumes of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, 3rd Edition

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Bijou Theatre, 38 East 5th Street, Cincinnati, OH

J. M. B., Moving Picture World, August 13, 1910:

Bijou1_pe

“The marble ticket office in front of the Bijou, Cincinnati, is of simple but rich design, with  fancy brass grille work and surmounted by a dome of fine open metal work. The balcony, with its green (natural) plants and flowers in bloom, calls for much admiration and gives an atmosphere of freshness to the place.

Here again I  noted a total absence of ugly loose posters. The posters are framed, even the advance poster of the ‘Roosevelt’s Return‘ film is framed and placed on a neat easel.” 

bijou2_pe

“Bijou Theater, Cincinnati, at night” 

 

Cezar Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently seeking funding for “Editing & Formatting” the first three volumes of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, 3rd Edition

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Flying “A” in Poole

Moving Picture World, September 21, 1912:
“S. S. Hutchinson, president of The American Film Mfg. Co., who has just returned from Europe, tells some interesting things of theater advertising in England.”

flying day_pe 

“‘I found many theaters in the heart of London advertising Flying A days,’ said Mr. Hutchinson. ‘The custom is spreading fast and seems to be highly successful.  Theaters are more pretentiously decorated and generally show more attention to details in that manner than we do here. In addition to the usual posters are many colored banners and flags all combining to make a most inviting bid for business.”

Poole Electric Theatre

Poole High Street Project 

santaSanta Barbara Historical Museum

The Short, Happy Life of Flying A 

Former Flying A Studios

 

Cezar Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently seeking funding for “Editing & Formatting” the first three volumes of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, 3rd Edition

AboutMe

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Elite Theatre, Excelsior Springs, Missouri

The Film Index, July 23, 1910:

elite

“Charles L. Marshall, Proprietor. Admission 5 and 10 cents. One of the most attractive picture theatres in Missouri. Service support by the Yale Film Exchange.”

Cezar Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently seeking funding for “Editing & Formatting” the first three volumes of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, 3rd Edition

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Clune’s Broadway Theatre, 528 S. Broadway, Los Angeles, CA 90013

New York Dramatic Mirror, November 9, 1910:
“Clune’s new picture house, Los Angeles, Cal., seating 900 people and costing over $50,000, was opened to the public at 10, 15 and 20 cent prices Oct. 10.
“Mr. Clune runs two shows in the afternoons and two in the evenings; five films and four singers, together with a ten-piece orchestra, furnish the balance of the programme.
“Around the walls of this spacious theatre are electric chimes and bells, and the decorations are dainty and tastefully carried out. The immense electric sign on the roof outside cost $3,500 and is conceded to be the largest and most beautiful west of New York.
“The completion of the house gives the Clune Amusement Company two large houses in this city, one in San Diego, and a house seating 1,400 people being erected in Pasadena and which will be thrown open about the middle of November. Negotiations are being entered into for houses for this company in both Phoenix, Ariz., and Salt Lake City,U.”

The painting on the curtain is of the harbor at Avalon, Catalina Island.

Two other early trade publications offer conflicting opening dates:

The New York Clipper, November 5, 1910:
“The opening of Clune’s Broadway Theatre, last week, added a most attractive moving picture show house to the many now established in Los Angeles, CA. It has a seating capacity of nine hundred and is strictly up-to-date. Manager Wm. H. Clune is now operating three first class places in this city.”

Moving Picture World, November 12, 1910:
“The latest and most beautiful moving picture theater has been completed and will open in a day or two. The situation of this new enterprise is on South Broadway, just north of Mercantile place and will be known as the Clune Theater.”

Deadlines and publication dates may have contributed to this confusion.

When Clune’s closed as the Cameo in 1991 it was the longest continually operating movie theatre in California.

Clune’s Broadway

Los Angeles Conservancy

Cezar Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently seeking funding for “Editing & Formatting” the first three volumes of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, 3rd Edition

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Liberty Theatre, 266 S. Main St., Los Angeles, CA

Seating Capacity: 540
Architect: A. C. Martin
Construction: P. J. Bolin
Proprietors: Kaiser, Sturm, & Hughes 
 
 

Excerpts from Moving Picture World, April 1, 1911:
“The ‘Liberty’ is one of the city’s eight first-class moving picture theaters. The selection of the theater site was chosen with exceptionally good judgement. The theater is located in the heart of the business district at 266-68  South Main Street, at the intersection of Third and Main Streets.”

“The front facade is of stucco and plaster-covered brick, the paneling and cornices outlined in small electric lights at night. The gold leaf statue crowning the cornice is ten feet in height, and, symbolizing liberty, holds aloft an electric torch. At the base of the statue in a laurel leaf gilded shield is the date of erection, 1910. Below this, on the crown of the shell-shaped lobby ceiling, is a second shield in gold leaf with the theater name ‘Liberty.’

“The floor of the lobby is of white tile, inlaid with a series of swastika design borders in green tile. The side walls of the lobby are wainscoted in white Italian marble to a height of eight feet, crowning which is a twelve-inch moulded cap of mahogany. The entrance doors are of mahogany, their bases trimmed in brass, and their upper panels of plate glass.

“The box office is roomy. It is also wainscoted in marble, the woodwork of the upper part  being in mahogany and the windows of plate glass.

“The brick wall of the lobby contains a beautiful leaded art glass window, semi-circular in shape, with a landscape design of beautiful coloring, especially so when seen illuminated at night. Bordering the design are the words ‘Continuous Performance.’ Radiating from the art glass window, which forms the nucleus of the shell, are a series of stucco shell ribs, each containing fifteen clear-globed eight-candlepower lights.”

“The inner lobby leading to the auditorium is 15×20 feet in size. The floor is of white tile, with six inch baseboard of marble. The lobby is paneled in oak to a height of 30 inches, above which it is covered with an imitation leather fabric.”

“Opening off the lobby are retiring rooms for both men and women, the rooms also being finished in tile and marble. A narrow stairway opening off the lobby leads to the office, operators booth and organ loft.

“The operators booth is roomy and is equipped with the latest apparatus, including two Edengraph projectoscopes and a stereopticon. To the right of the operator’s balcony is the organ loft, containing a large pipe organ, a valuable addition to the orchestra in accompanying religious and special films.”

“The [auditorium] seats are of wood with iron standards. The side walls of the auditorium are paneled to a height of three feet in oak, above which are a series of five landscape paintings on each side, the borders of which are outlined with stenciled designs of a darker shade than the light green color scheme of the side walls.

“The height of the auditorium is twenty-four feet, and the stage is sixteen feet square. Facing the stage on each side are singing booths. The auditorium is illuminated by ceiling lights and ten pairs of art glass side lights of tulip design with green globes. The ceiling is of white plaster with cream trim, and from it are suspended five electric fans.

“The theatre is showing four first-run licensed films, and one illustrated song, except on Saturdays and Sundays, when two songs are used.

“The theater employs ten people. Girl ushers look after the seating arrangements. Five cents admission is charged to all parts of the house.”

“The theatre was completed early in the year and has played to good business ever since.”

For more on the Liberty

 

Cezar Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently seeking funding for “Editing & Formatting” the first three volumes of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, 3rd Edition

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Montgomery Theatre, Atlanta, GA.

Moving Picture World, September 23, 1911:

Entrance to Montgomery Theater, Atlanta, Ga.”

“View of Interior of Montgomery Theater, Atlanta, Ga., taken from the balcony, showing sheet, pipe organ and orchestra enclosure, and singer’s balcony on right of sheet.”

“The Montgomery is on Peachtree Street, just above Auburn Avenue, splendidly located for the purpose, and is now doing the record business for pictures in that city.”

“Since achieving success in this venture, Mr. Montgomery has moved upon Augusta and other cities of the South, and more triumphs will be recorded as he progresses.”

“View of interior of Montgomery Theater, Atlanta, Ga., taken from the singer’s balcony showing gallery arrangements.”

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently seeking funding for “Editing & Formatting” the first three volumes of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, 3rd Edition

AboutMe

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Children’s Matinee at the Favorite

The Film Index, March 12, 1910:

Favorite Theatre, St. Louis, Missouri 

“Photograph taken just before the matinee performance on Sunday afternoon, January 23, 1910, and illustrates the popularity of this house with the young folks.”

“The proprietor, Mr. John Rabenau, has given special attention to the subject of entertaining the children at his theatre and appearances prove that he has succeeded. The house is located at 2701 Cherokee street.”

Historical Marker

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently seeking funding for “Editing & Formatting” the first three volumes of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, 3rd Edition

AboutMe

Goodreads

Medotcom