Lubin Theatre, Studio and Office

The Moving Picture World, April 25, 1908:

lubin_pe

“As intimated in our Philadelphia notes last week, S. Lubin has purchased the property at 926 Market street for $307,000. Mr. Lubin has since favored us with a cut showing the front of the building, which we take pleasure in reproducing, showing. as it does, one of the handsomest and most popular theaters in Philadelphia.

“The executive offices of S. Lubin are located on the first floor over the theater, in the rear of this is the studio, occupying and ‘L’ extension, on the upper floors are the machine shops and dark rooms.”

Siegmund Lubin–“America’s first movie mogul”

 

Legendary theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle is celebrating 20 years of theatre talks and walks, 1996-2016. Currently accepting bookings for historical societies, libraries , senior centers, etc.  Details of independent walks will be published this fall.

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres. The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently editing and updating the third edition of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, Volume I.

Selling  on Etsy and Amazon

 

 

 

 

Booth in the Window at the Bijou

Moving Picture World, November 26, 1910

Excerpts from a letter by John Blohm, owner and manager of the Bijou Theatre, Chesley, Ontario, Canada.

canada_pe

“We have several photoplay theaters here in Western Ontario, though as the enclosed postcard [above] shows, they are on a small scale. The towns here are small, ranging from 1,500 to 3,000 population. Every one of the photoplay theaters I have installed, however, is on a paying basis. Why? Because I have the very best projection possible.

“As you can see on the postcard, my operating booth is in the window. We sometimes throw a picture across the street onto a wall by holding two mirrors in front of the lens. This is done as an ad, of course.”

An illustrated song slide in the lower corner of the postcard.

 

Legendary theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle is celebrating 20 years of theatre talks and walks, 1996-2016. Currently accepting bookings for historical societies, libraries , senior centers, etc.  Details of independent walks will be published this fall.

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres. The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently editing and updating the third edition of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, Volume I.

Selling  on Etsy and Amazon

 

Apolo Theatre, Manila, Philippines

Moving Picture World, December 3, 1910:

apolo_pe (Large)

“From the far-off Philippines comes a very appreciative letter from a World reader and a photograph of his theater.  The following extract from his letter may be of interest to our readers:

‘Herewith description of my theater: The house is located on the principal street of Manila; seats 470 people; performance from 4:30 until 11 P. M.; prices range from 50 cents to 20 cents  (Philippine currency); my orchestra consists of nine pieces; I change twice a week and run about three thousand feet for each performance or change.

‘At present I use nothing but Pathe films. Business is very good here. Manila has now twenty-three motion picture theaters, with only one exchange, and that is for Pathe; no American films are here as yet. I think it is a good field for a live, hustling American film exchange here. Again thanking you for your favors, I remain, H. Frankel.’ ”

 

Cezar Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres. The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

He is available for theatre talks and walks in 2015: historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

 

Now selling “vintage” on Etsy.

Gaiety Theatre, 539 Rue Sainte-Catherine Ouest, Montreal, Canada

Moving Picture World, October 21, 1911:

GaietyOct211911_pe (Medium)

“The Gaiety of Montreal cleared $300 profit after a three days run of the Thanhouser two-reel production of Romeo and Juliet. The manager writes that the success of the pictures were phenomenal. All the highest averages of previous successes were broken.

“The Gaiety advertised the pictures well in advance. It plastered up the front of the house, as the cut shows, with one sheets and three sheets.

“It covered the town with handbills and posters. The results far exceeded their most optimistic expectations. The returns they got not only demonstrates what live-wire advertising methods will do, but illustrates the drawing power of classic films.”

Rome & Juliet 

Thanhouser

Gaiety Theatre

 

Cezar Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres. The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

He is available for theatre talks and walks in 2015: historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

Now selling “vintage” on Etsy.

 

Comedy Theatre, 46 East 14th Street, New York,NY

Moving Picture World, May 28, 1910:

comedy theatre 1910

“We present herewith the portrait of Albert A. Kaufman, manager of the Comedy Theatre, who is reported to be the youngest man in his particular line. On account of the competition of adjacent licensed houses, the Comedy uses Independent service which is supplied by William Steiner’s film exchange.

kaufman

Albert A. Kaufman

Three reels constitute the show and with 5 cents admission on weekdays and 10 cents on Saturday and Sunday, the Comedy does a  standing  room business  and Mr. Kaufman is well satisfied  with his receipts.

One excellent feature of Mr. Kaufman’s management is that patrons of this theater are not allowed to find their way to seats. Ample standing room is allowed  while a show is in progress, behind the chairs and as this space slopes with the floor, even those standing can get a full view of the screen.

This is the second of the prominent theaters on Moving Picture Row  to install the Independent service and Mr. Kaufman seems to be well pleased with the treatment that he receives from Bill Steiner and his staff.

 

Romany Rob’s Revenge

Cezar Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres. The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

He is available for theatre talks and walks in 2015: historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

Colonial Theatre, 525 George Street, Sydney, NSW

Excerpts from Moving Picture World, May 28. 1910:

MPW May2810

“There are now over fifty moving picture theaters in full swing in Sidney and suburbs and there are four more just on the point of completion and will open inside of another week.

“We reproduce herewith a photograph of The Colonial, Sydney, which is known as Australia’s first continuous moving picture show. The house, which is modeled after the prevailing American style, owned and managed by J.D. Williams, and American from Spokane, Wash.

“Mr. Williams has recently spent $8,000 in alterations and decorations, but he is in the right with the antipodeans, as he is filling his house and making money.”

 

Cezar Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres. The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

He is available for theatre talks and walks in 2015: historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

AustraliaWikipedia: Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is a country comprising the mainland of the Australian continent, the island of Tasmania, and numerous smaller islands. It is the world’s sixth-largest country by total area. Neighbouring countries include Indonesia, East Timor and Papua New Guinea to the north; the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu to the north-east; and New Zealand to the south-east.

Smallest Theatre in Kansas City, Missouri

Moving Picture World, July 15, 1916:

sapphire

“The smallest moving picture house in Kansas City is in the heart of the business district and has as competitors the newest house in the city and two others, all of which are located in the same block. The theater is the Sapphire, at 107 East 12th Street, which seats 185 people. The house has been in its present location since 1908, but A. E. Elliott, present manager and owner, did not get hold of it until October 1913.

“The Sapphire is a success without any possible doubt. So much confidence did the owner of the ground have in Elliott and the Sapphire that, without one dollar security, Mr. Elliott was able to obtain a 99-year lease on the property. So it looks as if Kansas City will have its midget showhouse for some time to come.

“As many as 3,000 people per day have witnessed shows in this little theater, making nearly eighteen performances per day necessary. Regular patronage is assured by this house, which makes a specialty of showing serials, and which has had first downtown run on every large Universal serial ever released.

“Here is another remarkable fact: Five cents is the admission fee most of the time. Special pictures and features bring an increase. Taking it all in consideration, it looks as if some larger houses might well adopt some of the policies of this little playhouse, if they are after real success.”

Posters:
Gertie’s Gasoline Glide starring Gertrude Selby and Billy Bevan

Floorwalker with Charlie Chaplin

Is that a Chaplin impersonator doing a ballyhoo in front of the theatre? A common practice at the time.

 

Cezar Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, chosen 2010 Best Book of the Year by the Theatre Historical Society.

He is available for theatre talks and walks in 2014, historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.