Gane’s Manhattan Theatre

The Film Index, February 5, 1910:

Ganes (3)

“Mr. William Gane, General Manager of the Moving Pictures Company of America, proprietor of this house, is shown standing at the right of the entrance. William Wright of Kalem Co., stands at the extreme left of the picture.”

Photos of the Kalem Stock Company are on display. The stage attraction is Ala Rajah, “wizard of  Sahara–he is not only mystifying he is really startling.”

The Film Index, January 22, 1910:
“Since its opening on September 13, 1909, Gane’s Manhattan Theatre at Broadway and 31st street, has been playing to its full capacity, and at times it is necessary to turn many away, especially in the evening, because of the lack of room.

“Yet the theatre is a very large and very modern one. Three stories of a big office building were torn out and remodeled. The back  of the orchestra is on a level with the street and gradually slopes down to the basement of the building.

“The balcony occupies what was  the second and third stories. Boxes are on either side of the orchestra. A large well-equipped stage affords room for any kind of vaudeville act. The house is artistically decorated and handsomely carpeted throughout. It is owned by the Moving Picture Company of America, of which Mr. Gane’s is the general manager.”

Cezar Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently seeking funding for “Editing & Formatting” the first three volumes of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, 3rd Edition

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Kalem Night at the Millard

The Film Index, May 27, 1911:

“Reception to Kalem Players”
“One of the pleasant features of the homecoming of the section of the Kalem Stock Company  recently engaged in Florida, was a reception to the leading members of the Millard Theatre, Amsterdam avenue and 89th street [NYC], on Friday evening May 12.

“Most of  the players were introduced  to  the audience, among them Sidney Olcott, the director, Miss Gene Gauntier, the leading woman, Miss Ethel Eastcourt, Mr. and Mrs. Jack Ridgley, J. P. McGowan and Mr. and Mrs. G. K. Hollister”

kalem1_pe

“Mr. McGowan delivered a short address in which he urged the merits of the photoplay theatre as an amusement for children and called attention to the moral tones of the Kalem product.

Announcement also made of the projected trip to Ireland, which was received by the audience with appreciation.

Adjournment was made to a nearby hotel where the players were entertained by Mr. and Mrs. Oakes, owners of the theatre.”

Opened in 1908, the Millard was owned and operated by Lee A. Ochs, not Oaks.

Jane’s History Nook

Blazing the Trail to Ireland

Kalem Comes to Jacksonville

Cezar Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently seeking funding for “Editing & Formatting” the first three volumes of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, 3rd Edition

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Captured on East 14th Street

Moving Picture World, September 23, 1910:

captured_pe

“The Comedy is one of the most successful picture houses in New York. It is operated on a continuous policy, two projecting machines being used, thus doing away with waits or delays.

“The only feature about the theatre which we could  not commend  was the excessive poster display in the lobby and around the front. Manager Kauffman agrees this did not add to the beauty of his house and he would willingly dispense with this method of advertising if he was sure his business would not suffer, but he felt that his receipts were at least thirty-five per cent due to banners and posters.

“We presume this is his reason for the exaggerated showing of supposed scenes from the films, yet we believe the business would not suffer were artistic signs and banners used in smaller numbers.” 

 

wireless

Moving Picture World, September 10, 1910

Captured by Wireless

Comedy Theatre
45 East 14th Street
New York, NY

 

Cezar Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently seeking funding for “Editing & Formatting” the first three volumes of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, 3rd Edition

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The Prospect Hotel, Coney Island

Prospect

 

Moving Picture World, June 17, 1911:
“The fact that Coney Island, N. Y., is fast becoming one of the central points for the exhibition of moving pictures. and even now is assuming the name ‘Flicker Alley,’ is strongly evidenced by the number of sales recorded by manufacturers and dealers in moving picture apparatus and supplies.

“The latest arrivals in the exhibiting field at this popular resort are Morris Goldberg, operating the Prospect Hotel, Mr. E. F. McGann, of McGann’s Hotel, and Dickers Hotel, all if which have installed a Powers Cameragraph Number 6*, and equipment.”

*Projector

Coney Island Museum, Saturday, June 29, 5pm:
Ask the Experts: Cezar Del Valle – Son of Coney Island Goes to the Movies

 

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Updated third edition of the Brooklyn Theatre Index  will be available in 2019 .

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Medotcom

 

 

 

 

 

Manhattan Theatre Provides for Horses

The Moving Picture News, July 22, 1911:

Manhattan_pe_pe

“Last week when New York’s dumb animals as well as the human portion of its population were sweltering in the heat, William J. Gane, of the Manhattan Theater, gave water to a thirsty horse in front of his theater on the corner of Broadway and 31st street.  While the horse drank he took the hose and sprinkled it with the fresh cool water; for his pains he was fined ten dollars.

“However, Mr. Gane, seeing the comfort the horse derived from its shower, in the kindness of his heart, immediately installed a couple of real shower baths at the edge of the pavement directly in front of the Manhattan, and here hundreds of our dumb friends reveled, during the recent hot wave, in the refreshing spray so thoughtfully  provided for them by the big-hearted manager.”

 

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

Walks also available at Local Expeditions

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Editing and updating the third edition of the Brooklyn Theatre Index.

AboutMe

Goodreads

Medotcom

 

War Cloud Takes Over Washington

After a career on the legitimate stage and in vaudeville, Chief War Cloud took over management of the Washington Theatre, South & Washington Street, Jamaica, Queens.

The Daily Long Island Farmer, December 16, 1912:

cloud

 

“The new proprietor, who will run the place as a first class motion picture house, and who has had plenty of opportunity to learn show business from A to Z, is a real Indian chief, but has lived almost all his life among white people. He is a college graduate and knows very well the customs of social life.

“He is Chief War Cloud of the Beule Sioux of North Dakota. When he was four years old he was transported from the wilds of the West to the vicinity of 42nd street and Broadway, New York, being adopted by a family of means.

“He is 45 years of age and speaks English better than his racial tongue. He studied at the Carlisle Indian School, where he played on the football team for which that institution is famous. He is also a 32nd degree Free Mason.

“Chief War Cloud has had much success in the presentation of Indian plays and sketches on the vaudeville stage, and is now going to run a theatre of his own.”

 

Legendary theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle is celebrating 20 years of theatre talks and walks, 1996-2016. Currently accepting bookings for historical societies, libraries , senior centers, etc.  Details of independent walks will be published this fall.

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres. The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently editing and updating the third edition of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, Volume I.

Selling  on Etsy and Amazon

 

Big Solax Jubilee at the Queen’s

The Moving Picture News, May 25, 1912:

may 25 1912_pe

“Queen’s Theatre on Third avenue and Fifty-ninth street, New York, one of the neatest and best managed picture houses in New York City, recently featured a Solax night with remarkable success.

“They ran an exclusive Solax program. Besides ‘The Sewer,’ the two reel feature, they ran ‘Saved by a Cat,’ ‘Billy’s Nurse’ and ‘Billy’s Shoes.” Darwin Karr, the Solax leading man, who does such heroic work in ‘The Sewer’ and ‘Saved by a Cat,’ personally appeared after the pictures. Billy Quirk was also there and entertained. Blanch Cornwall made her bow, and Director Warren told how pictures are taken.

Solax Films 

The Sewer

 

Legendary theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle is celebrating 20 years of theatre talks and walks, 1996-2016. Currently accepting bookings for historical societies, libraries , senior centers, etc.  Details of independent walks will be published this fall.

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres. The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently editing and updating the third edition of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, Volume I.

Selling  on Etsy and Amazon

 

Fire, Sparta Theatre, Bowery, Coney Island, Brooklyn

On Sunday, July 12, 2015,  Cezar Del Valle, author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index Volume III, hosts the cHURCH OF MONICA, Open Source Gallery, with an illustrated talk on the history of Coney Island theatre.

0034

The Evening Telegram, August 10, 1904:
“The first intimation that a blaze existed was given to the audience on the canvas in which the moving pictures were being shown. The machine itself caused the fire as the result of the photographic films coming in contact with the carbon flame.

“On the canvas was being shown a picture of Dante’s ‘Inferno.’ When the film caught fire it was passing behind lens at a rapid rate and for the space of a minute the real flames were reflected into the picture ‘Inferno.’ At first the audience thought the reflection was part of the picture, but the cry of fire brought them to a realization that the picture was near to being real.

“The picture machine was located in a partly enclosed booth in the balcony of the music hall. The flames spread to the second floor in spite of the fact that the booth was sheathed in tin. Johnson Smith, the operator was burned about the face and hands while making his escape from the booth.”

Above photo from a postcard in the Theatre Talks Collection, please ask permission to copy and/or use. At least give credit to source. We know that some people will not honor this but it would be nice if they did.

Cezar Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres. The first two chosen 2010 Best Book of the Year by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

He is available for theatre talks and walking tours in 2015: historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

Now selling “vintage” on Etsy.

Holland Brothers’ Kinetoscope Parlor, 1155 Broadway, New York, NY

The commercial history of motion pictures begins on April 14, 1894 with the opening of the Holland brothers’ kinetoscope parlor at 1155 Broadway in New York City.

holland bros_pe
From Who’s Who of Victorian Cinema

Excerpts from The Sun, May 25, 1894:
“The latest of Wizard Edison’s inventions, the kinetoscope is on exhibition at 1,155 Broadway. Although the apparatus is to a considerable extent a resemblance to a toy that has long been a favorite with children, it has new features, and illustrates principles in photography, optical illusions, and electricity that render it of interest.

“Mr. Edison has succeeded in constructing a machine which brings a series of photographs before the eye with such great rapidity that the eye cannot detect the change from one photograph to the next. This produces the effect of lifelike action in the series of views. Ten views are now on exhibition.

“The first shows Sandow, the strong performing his feats. Then there is a scene in a barber shop in which a customer takes his place in a chair and the barber shaves him in regular style. Bertoldi, the contortionist, whose photograph is not more than an inch in length, gives one of her difficult exhibitions,

“There are a wrestling contest, a rooster fight, a Highland dance, an organ grinder with monkey, three blacksmiths at a forge, and a gymnast in a flying ring exercise.

“Three blacksmiths at the forge are very lively in their movements, it being evident that they are impressed with the importance of striking while the iron is hot. They are thirsty after the iron is shaped, and each in turn takes a drink from a bottle in a manner amusing to the spectator.

“Although the kinetoscope is far from being a perfect machine, it combines principles which Mr. Edison may greatly improve in the near future. The name of the machine is not an invention of the ‘Wizard.’ It is in the dictionary.”

Cezar Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres. The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

He is available for theatre talks and walks in 2015: historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

Now selling “vintage” on Etsy.

Yorkville Hippodrome, 499 First Avenue, New York, NY

The Film Index, October 9, 1909:

yorkville1_pe (Medium)

“The Hippodrome was opened January , 1909, and cost $21,000 to build. The dimensions are 22 feet 6 inches front, by 102 feet deep, with an ‘L’ in the rear which gives a width of 39 feet.

“The auditorium includes a balcony which affords ample seating capacity. There is a commodious stage with a 20 foot opening, with all drops and scenery necessary for vaudeville acts.

“The lobby is 12 feet deep and brilliantly illuminated. Every possible means of fireproofing the Hippodrome was employed in its construction. The ceiling and walls are of steel and costs $1,600. During the exhibition of pictures the auditorium is made comparatively light by use of green lamps and shades.

“Uniformed help add to the general attractiveness of the place. The Hippodrome can be numbered among the best of the modern picture houses.

 

Cezar Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres. The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

He is available for theatre talks and walks in 2015: historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

Now selling “vintage” on Etsy.