Manhattan Theatre Provides for Horses

The Moving Picture News, July 22, 1911:

Manhattan_pe_pe

“Last week when New York’s dumb animals as well as the human portion of its population were sweltering in the heat, William J. Gane, of the Manhattan Theater, gave water to a thirsty horse in front of his theater on the corner of Broadway and 31st street.  While the horse drank he took the hose and sprinkled it with the fresh cool water; for his pains he was fined ten dollars.

“However, Mr. Gane, seeing the comfort the horse derived from its shower, in the kindness of his heart, immediately installed a couple of real shower baths at the edge of the pavement directly in front of the Manhattan, and here hundreds of our dumb friends reveled, during the recent hot wave, in the refreshing spray so thoughtfully  provided for them by the big-hearted manager.”

 

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

Walks also available at Local Expeditions

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Editing and updating the third edition of the Brooklyn Theatre Index.

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Yorkville Hippodrome, 499 First Avenue, New York, NY

The Film Index, October 9, 1909:

yorkville1_pe (Medium)

“The Hippodrome was opened January , 1909, and cost $21,000 to build. The dimensions are 22 feet 6 inches front, by 102 feet deep, with an ‘L’ in the rear which gives a width of 39 feet.

“The auditorium includes a balcony which affords ample seating capacity. There is a commodious stage with a 20 foot opening, with all drops and scenery necessary for vaudeville acts.

“The lobby is 12 feet deep and brilliantly illuminated. Every possible means of fireproofing the Hippodrome was employed in its construction. The ceiling and walls are of steel and costs $1,600. During the exhibition of pictures the auditorium is made comparatively light by use of green lamps and shades.

“Uniformed help add to the general attractiveness of the place. The Hippodrome can be numbered among the best of the modern picture houses.

 

Cezar Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres. The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

He is available for theatre talks and walks in 2015: historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

Now selling “vintage” on Etsy.

 

Elektra Theatre, 1039 North Gay Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21213

Moving Picture World, August 20, 1910

Elektra

“This handsome place of amusement has recently been finished, and is staged for vaudeville and moving picture productions. The structure of attractive design and appointments is fitted up with every convenience and comfort for its patrons.

“The seating capacity of two hundred and fifty is amply provided for in a spacious hall tastefully decorated in tans and cream colors, and illuminated with electric clusters. The pitch of the floor is decidedly pronounced to give excellent lines of sight from every point in the house. Every precaution has been taken against fire, and a particular study has been given the machine room, which is isolated and ventilated in such a manner as to eliminate any possible danger in this part of the building.

“The exits are all spacious and conveniently arranged, and the acoustics of the hall have been pronounced a distinct success. The front, of bold and somewhat spectacular design, is in keeping with the purpose of the building, and is agreeably decorated in two tones of ivory and gold.

“The building was designed by and erected under the supervision of Theodore Wells Pietsch, Architect.”

 

Cezar Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, chosen 2010 Best Book of the Year by the Theatre Historical Society.

He is currently accepting theatre talks and walks for 2014–historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.