Clune’s Broadway Theatre, 528 S. Broadway, Los Angeles, CA 90013

New York Dramatic Mirror, November 9, 1910:
“Clune’s new picture house, Los Angeles, Cal., seating 900 people and costing over $50,000, was opened to the public at 10, 15 and 20 cent prices Oct. 10.
“Mr. Clune runs two shows in the afternoons and two in the evenings; five films and four singers, together with a ten-piece orchestra, furnish the balance of the programme.
“Around the walls of this spacious theatre are electric chimes and bells, and the decorations are dainty and tastefully carried out. The immense electric sign on the roof outside cost $3,500 and is conceded to be the largest and most beautiful west of New York.
“The completion of the house gives the Clune Amusement Company two large houses in this city, one in San Diego, and a house seating 1,400 people being erected in Pasadena and which will be thrown open about the middle of November. Negotiations are being entered into for houses for this company in both Phoenix, Ariz., and Salt Lake City,U.”

The painting on the curtain is of the harbor at Avalon, Catalina Island.

Two other early trade publications offer conflicting opening dates:

The New York Clipper, November 5, 1910:
“The opening of Clune’s Broadway Theatre, last week, added a most attractive moving picture show house to the many now established in Los Angeles, CA. It has a seating capacity of nine hundred and is strictly up-to-date. Manager Wm. H. Clune is now operating three first class places in this city.”

Moving Picture World, November 12, 1910:
“The latest and most beautiful moving picture theater has been completed and will open in a day or two. The situation of this new enterprise is on South Broadway, just north of Mercantile place and will be known as the Clune Theater.”

Deadlines and publication dates may have contributed to this confusion.

When Clune’s closed as the Cameo in 1991 it was the longest continually operating movie theatre in California.

Clune’s Broadway

Los Angeles Conservancy

Cezar Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently seeking funding for “Editing & Formatting” the first three volumes of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, 3rd Edition

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Liberty Theatre, 266 S. Main St., Los Angeles, CA

Seating Capacity: 540
Architect: A. C. Martin
Construction: P. J. Bolin
Proprietors: Kaiser, Sturm, & Hughes 
 
 

Excerpts from Moving Picture World, April 1, 1911:
“The ‘Liberty’ is one of the city’s eight first-class moving picture theaters. The selection of the theater site was chosen with exceptionally good judgement. The theater is located in the heart of the business district at 266-68  South Main Street, at the intersection of Third and Main Streets.”

“The front facade is of stucco and plaster-covered brick, the paneling and cornices outlined in small electric lights at night. The gold leaf statue crowning the cornice is ten feet in height, and, symbolizing liberty, holds aloft an electric torch. At the base of the statue in a laurel leaf gilded shield is the date of erection, 1910. Below this, on the crown of the shell-shaped lobby ceiling, is a second shield in gold leaf with the theater name ‘Liberty.’

“The floor of the lobby is of white tile, inlaid with a series of swastika design borders in green tile. The side walls of the lobby are wainscoted in white Italian marble to a height of eight feet, crowning which is a twelve-inch moulded cap of mahogany. The entrance doors are of mahogany, their bases trimmed in brass, and their upper panels of plate glass.

“The box office is roomy. It is also wainscoted in marble, the woodwork of the upper part  being in mahogany and the windows of plate glass.

“The brick wall of the lobby contains a beautiful leaded art glass window, semi-circular in shape, with a landscape design of beautiful coloring, especially so when seen illuminated at night. Bordering the design are the words ‘Continuous Performance.’ Radiating from the art glass window, which forms the nucleus of the shell, are a series of stucco shell ribs, each containing fifteen clear-globed eight-candlepower lights.”

“The inner lobby leading to the auditorium is 15×20 feet in size. The floor is of white tile, with six inch baseboard of marble. The lobby is paneled in oak to a height of 30 inches, above which it is covered with an imitation leather fabric.”

“Opening off the lobby are retiring rooms for both men and women, the rooms also being finished in tile and marble. A narrow stairway opening off the lobby leads to the office, operators booth and organ loft.

“The operators booth is roomy and is equipped with the latest apparatus, including two Edengraph projectoscopes and a stereopticon. To the right of the operator’s balcony is the organ loft, containing a large pipe organ, a valuable addition to the orchestra in accompanying religious and special films.”

“The [auditorium] seats are of wood with iron standards. The side walls of the auditorium are paneled to a height of three feet in oak, above which are a series of five landscape paintings on each side, the borders of which are outlined with stenciled designs of a darker shade than the light green color scheme of the side walls.

“The height of the auditorium is twenty-four feet, and the stage is sixteen feet square. Facing the stage on each side are singing booths. The auditorium is illuminated by ceiling lights and ten pairs of art glass side lights of tulip design with green globes. The ceiling is of white plaster with cream trim, and from it are suspended five electric fans.

“The theatre is showing four first-run licensed films, and one illustrated song, except on Saturdays and Sundays, when two songs are used.

“The theater employs ten people. Girl ushers look after the seating arrangements. Five cents admission is charged to all parts of the house.”

“The theatre was completed early in the year and has played to good business ever since.”

For more on the Liberty

 

Cezar Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently seeking funding for “Editing & Formatting” the first three volumes of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, 3rd Edition

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Star Theatre, 50 Scollay Square, Boston, MA

Moving Picture Word, May 27, 1911:

“The Star was started August 1, 1907, and was completed and ready for the public by November 1, 1907. It has a frontage of thirty feet and a gross depth of nearly one hundred and twenty feet. The architecture of the house is unique, and calculated to catch and hold the attention of the passer-by, as can readily be understood from the photographs.” 

“The Star is the best fitted house in New England in electrical display, not barring any legitimate theater. The figures in the lobby were made after designs originated by the president of the Star Amusement Company.

Each are strongly favorable points for the Star. The three doors shown by the photographs are all wide exits, while the one to the right is also the regular means of entrance. The middle door is also used as an advertising medium, and is a work of art, made of mahogany with gold and inlaid handwork.

The admission fee is a flat rate of 10 cents, at any time of the day, with no rain-checks” of any sort. Four hundred and fifty-three (453) is the seating capacity, with a single aisle.”

“The house has twenty-six employees, running from a general manager and a house manager, to porters and ushers. Four reels of absolute first choice of Licensed pictures, and four acts of vaudeville comprise an excellent bill. The house projects what many in the trade consider to best picture in New England.

“A neat, clean house, courteous, uniformed ushers, with an excellent show and management make the Star’s success.”

A Lad from Old Ireland

The Cowboys and the Bachelor Girls 

Cezar Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently seeking funding for “Editing & Formatting” the first three volumes of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, 3rd Edition

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Whoopee Ti Yi Yo London

The Film Index, April 1, 1911:

“That the English photoplay lovers are particularly fond of the wild-west drama is illustrated in the acompanying photograph of the extensive advertising by the Empire Theater, a large photoplayhouse in  London, of the Essanay Western drama, ‘The Girl on Triple X.’

“‘The Indian Head’ films in London are always favorites with the English audiences, for the remarkable beauty of the scenery and the excellence of stories, acting and photography.

“Mr. Harry Spoor, the London Agent for the Essanay Productions, has been unusually successful in the English market and particularly so with the Essanay Company’s Western product.” “

The Girl on Triple X

 

Cezar Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently seeking funding for “Editing & Formatting” the first three volumes of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, 3rd Edition

AboutMe

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Two Cities at the Pickwick

The Film Index, April 1, 1911:

“Capacity houses with waiting crowds outside marked the five-days run of the ‘Tale of Two Cities’ at the Pickwick, which by the way may be called the pioneer of modern moving picture theatres in Washington [D.C.]. It was here that the ‘Passion Play’ was made famous and had the largest consecutive run anywhere.”

Tale of Two Cities

Pickwick Theatre

 

Cezar Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently seeking funding for “Editing & Formatting” the first three volumes of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, 3rd Edition

AboutMe

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The Illinois Theatre, 1252 Milwaukee Avenue, Chicago

The Film Index,  April 16, 1910:

illinois_pe

“The Illinois Theatre, at 1252 Milwaukee avenue, Chicago, was purchased by A. T. Steingard last June. Though a young man, he has displayed considerable managerial ability.

He dropped vaudeville as soon as he got control and is pleasing his numerous patrons with fine service, booked by the Theatre Film Service. He uses also the latest songs and good singers.

Mr. Steingard receives numerous compliments from his patrons on the pleasing quality of the entertainment offered.”

Cezar Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently seeking funding for “Editing & Formatting” the first three volumes of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, 3rd Edition

AboutMe

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Montgomery Theatre, Atlanta, GA.

Moving Picture World, September 23, 1911:

Entrance to Montgomery Theater, Atlanta, Ga.”

“View of Interior of Montgomery Theater, Atlanta, Ga., taken from the balcony, showing sheet, pipe organ and orchestra enclosure, and singer’s balcony on right of sheet.”

“The Montgomery is on Peachtree Street, just above Auburn Avenue, splendidly located for the purpose, and is now doing the record business for pictures in that city.”

“Since achieving success in this venture, Mr. Montgomery has moved upon Augusta and other cities of the South, and more triumphs will be recorded as he progresses.”

“View of interior of Montgomery Theater, Atlanta, Ga., taken from the singer’s balcony showing gallery arrangements.”

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently seeking funding for “Editing & Formatting” the first three volumes of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, 3rd Edition

AboutMe

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Children’s Matinee at the Favorite

The Film Index, March 12, 1910:

Favorite Theatre, St. Louis, Missouri 

“Photograph taken just before the matinee performance on Sunday afternoon, January 23, 1910, and illustrates the popularity of this house with the young folks.”

“The proprietor, Mr. John Rabenau, has given special attention to the subject of entertaining the children at his theatre and appearances prove that he has succeeded. The house is located at 2701 Cherokee street.”

Historical Marker

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently seeking funding for “Editing & Formatting” the first three volumes of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, 3rd Edition

AboutMe

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Children’s Matinee at Windle’s

Film Index, May 21, 1910:

“John Windle’s Variety Theatre, Pittsburg, PA.”

May 21, 1910_pe

“View taken on the occasion of a regular Children’s Matinee. This popular house is the first that was built on the Northside and does a phenomenal business. Its seating capacity is 500 and a 5c. and 10c. admission is charged.”

The Patient from Punkville, Pathe Freres, 1909

Adonis is Robbed of  His Clothes, Pathe Freres, 1909

The Way of the World, D. W. Griffith, Biograph, 1910

 

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently seeking funding for “Editing & Formatting” the first three volumes of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, 3rd Edition

AboutMe

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Roosevelt Hunting Big Game in Kansas

The Film Index, June 25, 1910:

June251910

Novelty Theatre, Winfield, Kansas
“C. E. Heimple, proprietor and manager; Jack Benson, assistant manager.
View of lobby showing display for ‘Roosevelt’ pictures.”

 

africa

Roosevelt in Africa

Since 1997 theatre historian,  Cezar Del Valle, has conducted a popular series of  theatre talks and walks, available for  historical societies, libraries, senior centers, etc.

Del Valle is the author of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, a three-volume history of borough theatres.

The first two chosen 2010 OUTSTANDING BOOK OF THE YEAR by the Theatre Historical Society. Final volume published in September 2014.

Currently seeking funding for “Editing & Formatting” the first three volumes of the Brooklyn Theatre Index, 3rd Edition

AboutMe

Goodreads

Medotcom